THE CHALLENGE

SAFE ROADS FOR LIFE 

THE CHALLENGE 

AIP Foundation was established in 1999, first in Vietnam, to implement life-saving, road crash prevention interventions and combat the growing crisis occurring across low and middle-income countries. Our offices and operations expand across Cambodia, China, India, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, and the Philippines, and previously had programs in Africa and Latin America.

 
Children are at risk

The road is an unforgiving environment. Every day, 200 children are killed in road traffic, many of them due to small mistakes when they try to cross the road, or as passengers on their mother’s or father’s motorbike.

Children struggle to understand how road traffic system works and they lack the sensory skills to assess speeds and risks.

At AIP we believe this is a completely unacceptable situation and we urgently want to change it. 

The road is an unforgiving environment. Every day, 200 children are killed in road traffic, many of them due to small mistakes when they try to cross the road, or as passengers on their mother’s or father’s motorbike.

Children struggle to understand how road traffic system works and they lack the sensory skills to assess speeds and risks.

At AIP we believe this is a completely unacceptable situation and we urgently want to change it. 

Helmet laws and enforcement are insufficient

Motorcyclists and cyclists pay a high price in case of a collision – often with their lives. Wearing a helmet is a cheap investment that can save lives. 

In the event of a crash, helmets are proven to reduce the risk of death by 42% and serious head injury by 69%. 

Moreover, it is easy to enforce. The use of helmets is, therefore, another low-hanging fruit. 

Motorcyclists and cyclists pay a high price in case of a collision – often with their lives. Wearing a helmet is a cheap investment that can save lives. 

In the event of a crash, helmets are proven to reduce the risk of death by 42% and serious head injury by 69%. 

Moreover, it is easy to enforce. The use of helmets is, therefore, another low-hanging fruit. 

Lack of sidewalks and safe crossings

Roads have for too many years been planned for vehicles alone. But they are also a part of the public space, namely where they traverse urban areas that often develop faster than expected. Here, safety should have first priority.

In many middle and low-income countries, there are a tremendous lack of sidewalks, safe crossing points, and traffic calming measures to secure adequate speeds. 

övergångsställe

Roads have for too many years been planned for vehicles alone. But they are also a part of the public space, namely where they traverse urban areas that often develop faster than expected. Here, safety should have first priority.

In many middle and low-income countries, there are a tremendous lack of sidewalks, safe crossing points, and traffic calming measures to secure adequate speeds. 

Advocacy for change is inadequate

In spite of the colossal loss of life, suffering and socio-economic losses, decision makers and authorities responsible for developing and managing road traffic systems worldwide are not committed to take responsibility and act.

Some are simply unaware of their responsibility and the options available to prevent road crashes. 

In spite of the colossal loss of life, suffering and socio-economic losses, decision makers and authorities responsible for developing and managing road traffic systems worldwide are not committed to take responsibility and act.

Some are simply unaware of their responsibility and the options available to prevent road crashes. 

Speeds are too high

The higher the speed, the more risk of a crash, and the worse the consequences will be when things go wrong.  A 5% cut in average vehicle speed can result in a 30% reduction in fatal crashes.

This is a physical fact, yet there is a general lack of understanding of this and lack of action to control speeds effectively.

All the tools are at hand – knowledge, legislation, and technology – and speed management is therefore mainly a question of political and institutional will. It is a ‘low hanging’ fruit  which can yield good results at a low cost. 

The higher the speed, the more risk of a crash, and the worse the consequences will be when things go wrong.  A 5% cut in average vehicle speed can result in a 30% reduction in fatal crashes.

This is a physical fact, yet there is a general lack of understanding of this and lack of action to control speeds effectively.

All the tools are at hand – knowledge, legislation, and technology – and speed management is therefore mainly a question of political and institutional will. It is a ‘low hanging’ fruit  which can yield good results at a low cost. 

Poor road signs and markings

Good signs and markings are important for safety but are often poorly maintained and perceived as something optional.

However, they will be increasingly important with the emergence of automated vehicles as they will form the primary guidance system for a mix of human road users and automated vehicles, which must respect exactly the same rules.

Signs and markings, therefore, need to be well planned, clear and unambiguous.

Good signs and markings are important for safety but are often poorly maintained and perceived as something optional.

However, they will be increasingly important with the emergence of automated vehicles as they will form the primary guidance system for a mix of human road users and automated vehicles, which must respect exactly the same rules.

Signs and markings, therefore, need to be well planned, clear and unambiguous.

WE NEED TO

BECOME SAFETY AWARE

  • ROAD CRASHES 

           are a leading cause of death for children

            and young adults

  • EVERY 24 SECONDS

           someone is killed on the world’s roads

  • EACH YEAR 1.35 MILLION FATALITIES

       and 50 million injuries occur